Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

2017 Guide To CAD/CAM & Chairside Milling

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Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide information on CAD/CAM dentistry and the chairside milling of indirect restorations. After completing this course, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the key attributes of single-visit indirect restorative dentistry;

2. Review the process workflow options with CAD/CAM and chairside milling of restorations;

3. List potential advantages and disadvantages of chairside milling;

4. Describe the impact of CAD/CAM and chairside

Abstract

CAD/CAM technology has helped to transform the manner in which restorative treatment can be provided. In particular, the ability to provide patients with single-visit indirect restorations is appreciated by clinicians and patients. Chairside milling produces restorations that are at least as accurate as traditionally fabricated indirect restorations. Chairside milling also allows clinicians to optimize the process flow, reducing chairside time, increasing efficiency, and saving patients additional visits. As with other procedures, each step must be accurately performed. Once the learning curve has been mastered, chairside milling represents an accurate method to provide patients with efficient and esthetic restorative care.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 105 of 106

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Model-free crowns with CAD/CAM dentistry

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Date: 09-20-2017 12:31:09 pm

CAD/CAM has provided dentists and dental laboratories with the opportunity for collaboration on the fabrication and delivery of crowns, without the use of either traditional impressions or models. Inherently, this is a game changer that can be viewed from several perspectives.

Traditionally, impressions were taken and a model was either poured and trimmed in the lab area at the back of the dental office or sent to the laboratory for pouring. Impression materials must be of high quality, the actual impression taken requires expertise, and the impression must be properly treated/stored/shipped. Flaws found in impressions include voids due to the incorporation of bubbles or contamination, tears associated with undercuts, shrinkage due to drying or high temperatures, and margins missing due to incorrect isolation or lack of flow of the material around the margins of the prep. These pitfalls can be avoided with careful technique, use of a quality impression material, and proper handling. Potential flaws also include those associated with the pouring of the model – such as air voids and lack of detail due to poor reach of the stone into the model prior to setting (for instance, if a vibrator is not used to encourage flow of the stone material into all detailed areas of the impression).

Further considerations include the need for dies when fabricating indirect restorations from models as well as the potential for abrasion or damage to models, which may result in oversized or poor contacts, occlusal and intaglio dimensional inaccuracies. Infection control is also an essential component in the handling of traditional impressions. The impression must first be rinsed to remove saliva, blood and any other debris present, and then disinfected in accordance with the impression material manufacturer’s instructions before being dried, then shipped or poured. With CAD/CAM scanning, the scanner itself must be treated appropriately as recommended by the manufacturer.

There is no risk of material-related flaws with digital impressions. Provided tissue retraction (if required) and isolation are used, and the scan is properly executed and captured, the impression will be accurate. Model-free crowns remove the need for a poured or milled model, and speed up fabrication. CAD/CAM still permits milling of resin-based models if traditional fabrication of a crown is preferred or if the laboratory and dental office would like to check the fit of a milled crown on a model. In either case, the potential for error associated with stone models is avoided.

Increasingly, CAD/CAM model-free crowns are being fabricated, i.e., without the use of a milled model even for checking the contact and occlusions. Virtual articulators are used while designing the crown, and they result in an accurate and suitable crown occlusal form.

When introducing fabrication of model-free crowns in the laboratory, there are several important considerations for versatility and accuracy. The first is the accuracy of the CAD/CAM scanner and whether the system is open or closed. With an open system, the digital scans can be used with any system and design software. This clearly improves versatility, as does using a high-quality milling machine that is compatible with scans from any system. This also means that the office and laboratory are not locked in with one CAD/CAM solution provider. As such, an open system and versatile work flow are attractive options using a scanner and software system available from the same company, thereby simplfying manufacturer support.

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For both the dental office and dental laboratory, model-free crowns represent a marked change in procedure that can initially seem daunting, as there is no model for the dental technician or dentist to check the contours, margins and contact points. However, model-free milled crowns have proven to be reliable. It is always possible to mill models initially and to ascertain the fit of the model-free crown using the model until you have built up confidence that the results are accurate. After that, periodically using a milled model for spot checks is also an option, if preferred. As long as the scan was accurate in the first place, the model-free crown will be accurate. For crowns requiring esthetic customization, such as in the anterior zone, the crown can be milled and then custom-stained and glazed. By working with a local laboratory, if complex shade matching and customization are required it is also possible to have the patient visit the laboratory or for the laboratory technician to visit the dental office while the patient is being treated.

An additional aspect of CAD/CAM indirect restorations is to ensure that the luting agent used is compatible with the CAD/CAM block material. If in doubt, the CAD/CAM block manufacturer can be consulted as well as the luting agent manufacturer. Crowns arriving from the laboratory include information on the type of block that was specified and used, and commonly contain information on suitable luting agents.

Model-free crowns are faster to produce, accurate and less expensive than fabrication using models – mainly due to improved workflow and the automated design and fabrication, which reduces labor costs. In summary, model-free crowns can benefit the laboratory, the dental office and the patient.

References

1. Beuer F, Schweiger J, Edelhoff D. Digital dentistry: an overview of recent developments for CAD/CAM generated restorations. Br Dent J. 2008 May 10;204(9):505-11.

2. Ceranic D. Trends in implant dentistry: model-less restorations. Inclusive Implant Magazine. 2013;4(2). www.glidewelldental.com/inclusivemagazine/ volume4-2/implant-dentistry-trends.aspx. Accessed May 9, 2014.

3. Joda T, Brägger U. Digital vs. conventional implant prosthetic workflows: a cost/time analysis. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2014 Sep 2.

Article 4 of 4

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

The Digital Waterfall: Cutting Edge Technology for Today’s Super Dental Teams

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

Upon completing this webinar, participants will be able to:

•Discover the best new technologies of 2015, and learn how to integrate them into your practice today.

•Determine how to capitalize on each other’s skills to improve the productivity of your practice and the quality of the service your team produces.

•Review clinical cases delivering optimal dental care.

•Integrate systems to lower stress, prevent burnout, and increase your enjoyment of dentistry.

Abstract

The dental industry continues to thrive in the ever-evolving technological world, as new advances provide innovative ways to improve practices. This webinar will review some of the newest and best technologies, including CAD/CAM, lasers, ultrasonic scaling, and innovative isolation techniques. In addition, you will learn how to incorporate these technologies into your practice to improve overall workflow, productivity, and team camaraderie.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 86 of 106

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

The Clinical Application of CAD/CAM Technology and Materials

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information about the use of CAD/CAM technology and materials for the fabrication of definitive restorations. After reading this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Delineate the main differences between digital impressions and traditional techniques;

2. List and describe the various CAD/CAM materials and their uses;

3. Review the treatment of restorative surfaces and luting agent options; and

4. Describe the chairside steps required to deliver an indirect, resin nano-ceramic, same-day restoration.

Abstract

Restoring indirect restorations using digital impressions and CAD/CAM technology is a topic that has created a tremendous amount of interest in both the dental office and the dental laboratory. CAD/CAM technology has evolved into several systems that can be used for the fabrication of indirect restorations, together with the development of several restorative materials. The properties of these restorative materials and their indications and appropriate use must be understood in order to enable the achievement of predictable and esthetic results for patients.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 31 of 106

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

An Update on CAD/CAM Dentistry

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the delivery of indirect restorations using CAD/CAM dentistry. On completing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Describe the types of procedures that can be performed using CAD/CAM systems;

2. Review the considerations and features available when selecting a CAD/CAM system;

3. List and describe the properties and benefits achieved with laboratory fabricated CAD/CAM restorations versus chairside milling; and

4. Outline the sequence of steps when providing a CAD/CAM laboratory fabricated indirect restoration.

Abstract

CAD/CAM dentistry was a transformational change for dentistry. It is now possible to accurately scan and fabricate restorations, models, abutments, bars, prostheses and diagnostic wax-ups, as well as to use CAD/CAM for implant and orthodontic planning. Within the restorative dentistry discipline, in-office options for indirect restorations include traditional impressions, CAD scanning for traditional or CAM restoration fabrication, or CAD/CAM with chairside milling. The accuracy, versatility and reliability of CAD/ CAM systems as well as their ease-of-use, portability and cost are all considerations. In addition, different types of scanners have different attributes as do the programs supporting digital impressions and CAD/CAM. CAD/CAM has been proven to offer esthetic and durable solutions in esthetic dentistry.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

An Update on Digital Impressions

Categories:

Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on digital impressions.
After completing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Describe the changes that have occurred in digital impression technologies

2. List and describe differences between digital and traditional impression techniques

3. Review the differences between open and closed architecture, scanning options and
restorative options with different systems.

Abstract

Digital technologies have changed the world we live in, and have also resulted in significant changes in dentistry. One of these was digital impressioning, together with
CAD/CAM. Digital dental impressions were first introduced in the 1980s, with two available options: scanning and chairside milling of inlays and onlays; and digital scanning of stone models that had been poured from traditional impressions. Much has changed since then. The evolution of digital impressioning has resulted in it now being utilized for restorative care, implant components, splints, orthodontics and dentures. Digital impressioning is now mainstream. In the case of restorative care, not only the availability of accurate CAD/CAM systems5 but also esthetic and durable CAM restorative materials and advanced adhesive technologies have promoted the adoption of digital impression techniques.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

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