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Video: Durashield CV presented by Dr. Erin Thomas

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Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists

Duration: 2:07

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Synopsis

Dr. Erin Thomas speaks about Durashield CV

Videos 7 of 11

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Dental Unit Waterlines and Amalgam: Myths and Reality

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall objective of this webinar is to provide participants with an update on waterlines and related infection prevention pro­tocols, as well as the latest information on amalgam safety, handling and disposal.

On completion of this webinar, participants will be able to do the following:

1. List and describe the role of dental waterlines in cross-contamination and the transmission of microorganisms;

2. Describe infection prevention protocols as they relate to waterlines;

3. Review dental amalgam, including related oral and systemic health data; and

4. Describe ‘Best Practices’ for the handling and disposal of dental amalgam.

Abstract

Dental unit waterlines are a source of potentially pathogenic microorganisms and present a risk for the transmission of microorganisms and disease. Dental unit waterline biofilm has been found to contain microorganisms that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella species and Staphylococcus aureus. Until the death of a patient from Legionnaire’s disease in 2012 that was traced to dental treatment, no confirmed cases of transmission and disease as a result of dental unit waterline water output had occurred. Dental unit waterlines must be handled and treated appropriately to prevent the transmission of microorganisms and disease.

Variants of dental amalgam have been developed since the late 1700s Used as a cost-effective, durable and easy-to-use dental restorative, amalgam also poses a risk for mercury pollution. Mercury pollution associated with amalgam use may occur when amalgam is inappropriately handled and disposed of. This can lead to its incineration and the release of mercury into the atmosphere; into landfills from where mercury can leach into waterways or evaporate; and as sludge that also ends up in the soil and evaporating or leaching. Mercury finding its way into waterways ends up becoming part of the food chain and being ingested. The amount of mercury pollution resulting from dental amalgam use is considered to be relatively small compared to other sources. Safe amalgam handling measures include, but are not limited, to the use of amalgam separators to remove amalgam and other solids from evacuation lines, using an amalgam recycler, and avoiding flushing waste amalgam into the water system. Following the ADA Best Practices for amalgam handling reduces the amount of amalgam reaching the environment and thereby reduces mercury pollution.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 100 of 106

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Understanding Infection Control for Environmental Surfaces

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this webinar is to provide the participant with information on infection control procedures for environmental surfaces. On completing this webinar, participants will be able to:  

•Describe the CDC recommendations for the treatment of housekeeping and clinical contact surfaces;

•Review the use of wipes, solutions and sprays for clinical contact surfaces;

•List and describe considerations in selecting a surface disinfectant;

•Review the role of governmental agencies as it relates to surface disinfectants; and

•Describe important aspects of labelling for surface disinfectants.

Abstract

This webinar will address the infection control procedures related to environmental surfaces as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The treatment of both housekeeping and clinical contact surfaces will be discussed, including recent developments, together with available options and their use.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 88 of 106

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $39.00

Instrument Processing for Infection Prevention

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall objective of this article is to provide the reader with information on instrument processing. On completing this article, the reader will be able to do the following:

1. Define the elements of the chain of infection;

2. Delineate and describe the differences in the processing of critical, semicritical and noncritical instruments;

3. Review the use of presoaks and cleaning of instruments;

4. List and describe heat sterilization options and appropriate sterilization packaging; and

5. Review the uses and purposes of chemical and biological indicators.

Abstract

Safe and effective instrument processing is a key element of the infection prevention cycle. This process must meet CDC guidelines and OSHA requirements. The steps in instrument processing include cleaning and sterilizing the instruments. Their treatment depends on whether they are critical, semicritical or noncritical. Critical and heat-resistant critical instruments must be heat-sterilized, and handpieces must be autoclaved. Prior to heat sterilization, instruments are wrapped in appropriate FDA-cleared sterilization packaging, which must include chemical indicators. Sterilization processes must be tested for sterility assurance and all sterilization records maintained.

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $39.00

Course 33 of 106

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Environmental Surfaces, Dental Unit Waterlines and Evacuation Lines

Categories:

Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall objective of this article is to provide the reader with information on appropriate infection prevention protocols for environmental surfaces, waterlines and evacuation lines.

On completing this article, the reader will be able to do the following:

1.   List and describe the manner in which environmental surfaces may become contaminated and contribute to the chain of infection

2.   Review the methods by which housekeeping and  clinical contact surfaces can be cleaned and disinfected, as well as associated considerations

3.   List and describe the role of dental waterlines in cross-contamination and the transmission of microorganisms, and procedures that must be followed

4. Delineate the role of evacuation cleaners, their use and considerations in their selection

Abstract

The treatment of environmental surfaces and dental unit waterlines (DUWs) is required for adequate infection prevention. Environmental surfaces include both clinical contact and housekeeping surfaces. Clinical contact surfaces must be treated with barrier protection or cleaned and disinfected for each and every patient, in accordance with guidelines, to prevent indirect transmission of microorganisms and disease. If barrier protection becomes compromised, the surface must then also be cleaned and disinfected. DUWs and evacuation lines must be treated on a daily basis. At the end of each day, evacuation lines must be flushed with a cleaner that will help reduce debris and microorganisms.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 24 of 106

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $29.00

Pathways to Infection Prevention

Categories:

Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide the reader with information on infection prevention. On completion of this course, participants will be able to:

1.Describe the chain of infection and modes of transmission

2.List the elements involved in the daily infection prevention cycle

3.Review the importance of hand hygiene, appropriate procedures, and factors that influence compliance with hand hygiene

4.List and describe the steps involved in the treatment of clinical contact surfaces

5.Delineate each step in instrument processing

6.Describe the activities necessary at the beginning and end of each day

Abstract

To prevent the transmission of microorganisms and disease, a robust infection control program is required. The guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control provide recommendations for infection control in the dental healthcare settings, and in order to break the chain of infection and prevent disease transmission attention to every detail of infection control procedures is required. Steps include those required at the beginning and end of the day, and repeated procedures that are performed for each and every patient. CDC guidelines, OSHA and EPA regulations must be followed and appropriate FDA-cleared supplies used for infection control.

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $29.00

Course 19 of 106