Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Analgesics in Dentistry

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Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide information on nonparenteral analgesics used in dentistry. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:
1. Describe opioid medications and aspects of the new ADA policy on opioids.
2. List and describe ingested nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used in dentistry for pain management.
3. Describe an inhaled NSAID that can be used for acute pain management.
4. Review findings from systematic reviews and trials comparing opioid and non-opioid analgesics.

Abstract

Historically, management of acute odontogenic pain in adolescents and adults has typically been accomplished through an approach that incorporated nonparenteral opioid and/or nonopioid analgesics. However, the availability of opioid analgesics has resulted in epidemic levels of opioid abuse and addiction. Alternative treatment strategies utilizing non-opioids are preferable for management of acute pain, where indicated, including moderate to severe pain. Non-opioids include NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and combination medications, and are more, or as, effective as opioids. This article reviews opioid medications before focusing on non-opioid analgesics, as both monotherapy and combination therapy, for the safe and effective management of acute postprocedural pain in dentistry.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Orapharma.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 121 of 122

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Sjögren Syndrome: Oral Manifestations, Complications and Management

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Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the management of the oral complications associated with Sjögren syndrome. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Describe classic signs and symptoms of Sjögren syndrome, and its prevalence;

2. List and describe changes in salivary flow and composition;

3. Review the oral complications of Sjögren syndrome; and,

4. Review options for the management of oral complications associated with Sjögren syndrome.

Abstract

Sjögren syndrome is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disease with significant oral and systemic complications. Oral manifestations and complications of this disease include parched oral mucosa, discomfort, increased risk for caries and dental erosion, increased prevalence of candidal infections, and other conditions. A diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome may be suspected if dry mouth and dry eyes are both present, however a definitive diagnosis requires further investigation. Management of the oral complications of this syndrome requires palliative care/treatment of dry mouth and preventive care. Given the increased risk for oral diseases and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, frequent recalls and therapy are required.

 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from ORAPHARMA.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 6 of 122

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information and scientific data on recurrent aphthous stomatitis. On completion of this course, the participant will be able to do the following:

1. List and describe the different types of recurrent aphthous ulcers;

2. Differentiate between recurrent aphthous ulcers and  herpes simplex ulcers;

3. List and consider the different types of ulcers and associated conditions that must be part of the differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcers; and

4. Provide an overview of the types of treatments available for the different categories of recurrent aphthous ulcer patients.

Abstract

Recurrent aphthous ulcers are commonly found in the general population. They consist of minor, major and herpetiform types. A number of factors are considered to be possible etiological factors for recurent aphthous ulcers; however their exact etiology remains unclear. Several systemic diseases and conditions associated with oral ulcerations and other causes of oral ulcerations must be considered during the differential diagnosis. Once a definite diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulceration has been made, the patient can be given palliative care for the lesions as well as advice and recommendations on nutrition, oral hygieen practices, and other factors that may be associated with his or her recurrent ulcers.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 35 of 122