Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

SALIVA CONTAMINATION: Achieving Isolation to Avoid its Adverse Effects

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

Educational Objectives

The goal of this course is to provide information on best methods for preventing saliva contamination in dental, orthodontic and endodontic procedures. After completing this article, the reader will:

1. Understand some of the natural benefits of saliva
2. Understand how salivary contamination can adversely affect
restorations and root canals
3. Have learned about various methods of moisture contamination
control
4. Understand the pros/cons of various methods of moisture control
5. Recognize clinical implications in the field of pediatric dentistry
and orthodontics.

Abstract

Despite its importance for dental health and normal digestive function, saliva can have an adverse effect on restorative materials and dental procedures. To prevent a negative outcome, care must be taken to avoid contamination by saliva. Practitioners have a number of methods for controlling saliva, and new systems and materials are currently in development. Methods for preventing saliva contamination vary widely amongst practitioners, and across specialties, for logistical reasons. Research comparing the merits of different methods can yield ambiguous results. Therefore, more research is needed.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 101 of 103

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Reprocessing and Maintenance of Handpieces and Attachments: Following the Recommendations

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on reprocessing and maintenance of handpieces and components. After reading this course, participants should be able to:
1. List and describe the recommended steps in handpiece reprocessing;
2. Describe key elements of the recent CDC Statement on handpiece reprocessing;
3. Review the handling of handpieces and components not attached to dental unit water or airlines; and,
4. Discuss issues that may occur associated with handpiece reprocessing and maintenance, causes and solutions.

Abstract

Instrument reprocessing of handpieces and attachments is an essential component of infection control and is based on the CDC guidelines. It is also essential that the manufacturer’s instructions for use (IFU) are followed and that all reprocessing procedures and the products used are in accordance with these. Handpieces and attachments that attach and detach to the dental unit’s air and water lines should be heat sterilized (autoclaved) in accordance with the IFU. In addition, the California Dental Practice Act, and regulations in other States require appropriate reprocessing as discussed in this article. For stand-alone cordless handpieces and motors, the manufacturer’s validated reprocessing instructions should be followed. Further, appropriate reprocessing and handpiece maintenance are important for the lifetime of handpieces (and attachments). Maintenance and proper use prevents wear, other damage and failure of handpieces and attachments.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 90 of 103

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Dental Amalgam: Strategies to Reduce Its Environmental Impact

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Date: 02-25-2019 10:54:37 am

Dental amalgam has proved to be a durable restorative material. However, it also is a source, albeit a minor one, of the mercury released into the environment by human activity. Improper disposal of amalgam waste results in its ending up in landfills, wastewater sludge or incinerators. Additionally, publicly owned treatment works (POTW) cannot remove 100% of the mercury from wastewater. The American Dental Association released its Best Management Practices for Amalgam Waste several years ago, detailing how amalgam waste can be disposed of safely. The recent EPA Final Rule mandates the use of amalgam separators to segregate solid waste from evacuation lines before it leaves the office toward the POTW. In addition, new rules on evacuation line cleaners and on the disposal of amalgam waste apply. The Minamata Treaty also provides nine measures related to amalgam, of which signatories are intended to choose at least two: to reduce the use of amalgam in the long term and to reduce its environmental impact.

Click here to take this course: https://dentallearning.net/ama-ce

Article 11 of 15

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Dental Amalgam: Strategies to Reduce Its Environmental Impact

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with information on requirements and best practices in the handling of amalgam. After completing this course, participants will be able to:
1. Describe how mercury reaches the environment and the impact of methylmercury
2. List and describe key elements of the EPA Final Rule and considerations for amalgam separators
3. Review best management practices for amalgam waste
4. Describe initiatives and options related to the future use of amalgam.

Abstract

Dental amalgam has proved to be a durable restorative material. However, it also is a source, albeit a minor one, of the mercury released into the environment by human activity. Improper disposal of amalgam waste results in its ending up in landfills, wastewater sludge or incinerators. Additionally, publicly owned treatment works (POTW) cannot remove 100% of the mercury from wastewater. The American Dental Association released its Best Management Practices for Amalgam Waste several years ago, detailing how amalgam waste can be disposed of safely. The recent EPA Final Rule mandates the use of amalgam separators to segregate solid waste from evacuation lines before it leaves the office toward the POTW. In addition, new rules on evacuation line cleaners and on the disposal of amalgam waste apply. The Minamata Treaty also provides nine measures related to amalgam, of which signatories are intended to choose at least two: to reduce the use of amalgam in the long term and to reduce its environmental impact.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 88 of 103

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Testing, Treating and Managing Dental Unit Waterlines

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Date: 01-04-2019 13:50:38 pm


Dental unit waterlines supply water to handpieces, air-water syringes, ultrasonic scalers, the cuspidor and the rinsing cup. Due to the nature of the tubing, as water passes through it, microbial colonization can occur and biofilm can accumulate within them. As such, dental unit waterlines are a source of potential pathogens, and must be maintained at the same water quality level as the public water supply, which is 500 CFU/mL of heterotrophic bacteria. Therefore, regular water testing, and dental unit waterline treatment and maintenance, are required to ensure the water quality for patients and dental healthcare workers.

Dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) consist of the tubes in the dental unit that connect the high-speed handpiece, air/water syringe, ultrasonic scaler, rinsing water and cuspidor water to the water supply Bio lms form in DUWLs as they are colonized by water-borne microorganisms, which can lead to contamination and potential health risks for patients and dental healthcare workers (DHCW). Water introduced into DUWLs typically meets the public health safety standards for potable (drinking) water. In the United States, that standard is less than or equal to 500 colony forming units (CFU) of heterotrophic bacteria per milliliter (mL) of water. The United States Army Dental Command (DENCOM) recommends less than or equal to 200 CFU/mL, while the European Union
(EU) guidelines recommend that drinking water should be delivered at <100 CFU/mL.

Educational Objectives
The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the management and treatment of dental unit waterlines. On completing this article, the reader will be able to:
1. Describe the features of dental unit waterlines that encourage biofilm to accumulate within them;
2. List key microorganisms that are potential pathogens for immune-compromised and other susceptible patients;
3. Review options for the management and treatment of dental unit waterlines; and,
4. Describe available options for testing the quality of water derived from dental unit waterlines.

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Article 8 of 15

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Testing, Treating and Managing Dental Unit Waterlines

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Students, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the management and treatment of dental unit waterlines. On completing this article, the reader will be able to:
1. Describe the features of dental unit waterlines that encourage biofilm to accumulate within them;
2. List key microorganisms that are potential pathogens for immune-compromised and other susceptible patients;
3. Review options for the management and treatment of dental unit waterlines; and,
4. Describe available options for testing the quality of water derived from dental unit waterlines.

Abstract

Dental unit waterlines supply water to handpieces, air-water syringes, ultrasonic scalers, the cuspidor and the rinsing cup. Due to the nature of the tubing, as water passes through it, microbial colonization can occur and biofilm can accumulate within them. As such, dental unit waterlines are a source of potential pathogens, and must be maintained at the same water quality level as the public water supply, which is 500 CFU/mL of heterotrophic bacteria. Therefore, regular water testing, and dental unit waterline treatment and maintenance, are required to ensure the water quality for patients and dental healthcare workers.

SPONSOR/PROVIDER: This continuing education activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the standards of the ADA Continuing Education Recognition Program (ADA CERP) through joint efforts between Dental Learning, LLC and Sterisil.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 71 of 103

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Environmental Surfaces, Dental Unit Waterlines and Evacuation Lines

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall objective of this article is to provide the reader with information on appropriate infection prevention protocols for environmental surfaces, waterlines and evacuation lines.

On completing this article, the reader will be able to do the following:

1.   List and describe the manner in which environmental surfaces may become contaminated and contribute to the chain of infection

2.   Review the methods by which housekeeping and  clinical contact surfaces can be cleaned and disinfected, as well as associated considerations

3.   List and describe the role of dental waterlines in cross-contamination and the transmission of microorganisms, and procedures that must be followed

4. Delineate the role of evacuation cleaners, their use and considerations in their selection

Abstract

The treatment of environmental surfaces and dental unit waterlines (DUWs) is required for adequate infection prevention. Environmental surfaces include both clinical contact and housekeeping surfaces. Clinical contact surfaces must be treated with barrier protection or cleaned and disinfected for each and every patient, in accordance with guidelines, to prevent indirect transmission of microorganisms and disease. If barrier protection becomes compromised, the surface must then also be cleaned and disinfected. DUWs and evacuation lines must be treated on a daily basis. At the end of each day, evacuation lines must be flushed with a cleaner that will help reduce debris and microorganisms.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 16 of 103

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $29.00

Pathways to Infection Prevention

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide the reader with information on infection prevention. On completion of this course, participants will be able to:

1.Describe the chain of infection and modes of transmission

2.List the elements involved in the daily infection prevention cycle

3.Review the importance of hand hygiene, appropriate procedures, and factors that influence compliance with hand hygiene

4.List and describe the steps involved in the treatment of clinical contact surfaces

5.Delineate each step in instrument processing

6.Describe the activities necessary at the beginning and end of each day

Abstract

To prevent the transmission of microorganisms and disease, a robust infection control program is required. The guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control provide recommendations for infection control in the dental healthcare settings, and in order to break the chain of infection and prevent disease transmission attention to every detail of infection control procedures is required. Steps include those required at the beginning and end of the day, and repeated procedures that are performed for each and every patient. CDC guidelines, OSHA and EPA regulations must be followed and appropriate FDA-cleared supplies used for infection control.
 

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $29.00

Course 15 of 103

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $39.00

Instrument Processing for Infection Prevention

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall objective of this article is to provide the reader with information on instrument processing. On completing this article, the reader will be able to do the following:

1. Define the elements of the chain of infection;

2. Delineate and describe the differences in the processing of critical, semicritical and noncritical instruments;

3. Review the use of presoaks and cleaning of instruments;

4. List and describe heat sterilization options and appropriate sterilization packaging; and

5. Review the uses and purposes of chemical and biological indicators.

Abstract

Safe and effective instrument processing is a key element of the infection prevention cycle. This process must meet CDC guidelines and OSHA requirements. The steps in instrument processing include cleaning and sterilizing the instruments. Their treatment depends on whether they are critical, semicritical or noncritical. Critical and heat-resistant critical instruments must be heat-sterilized, and handpieces must be autoclaved. Prior to heat sterilization, instruments are wrapped in appropriate FDA-cleared sterilization packaging, which must include chemical indicators. Sterilization processes must be tested for sterility assurance and all sterilization records maintained.

ADA Credits: 3 | AGD Credits: 3 | Cost: $39.00

Course 18 of 103