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CASE PRESENTATION  Digital Radiography for Increased Efficiency and Patient Comfort

Categories: Digital Radiography

Author(s): Marty Jablow

Date: 08-15-2020 09:35:09 am

    Digital radiography is nothing new, but our ability to use it efficiently continues to evolve. Whether using sensors or phosphor plate systems, we need to be able to produce diagnostic images to ensure proper diagnosis.

We have multiple phosphor plate (PSP) scanners and sensors in the office. Choosing the correct technology for the job at hand is the key. PSP systems allow us to acquire these images in a tried-and-true workflow without having to learn new techniques or purchase new holders.
A patient presents for their routine recare appointment, during which radiographs are needed. The patient is placed into position and protected using the Lead-Free X-ray Apron with thyroid collar (Kerr TotalCare) (Figure 1). The lead-free x-ray aprons are made of alloy sheeting that provides the same protection as lead, but are up to 30% lighter. The built-in thyroid collar protects the sensitive thyroid gland against radiation. Lead-free x-ray aprons are more comfortable for patients and lighter for staff to handle.
My hygienist prefers to use PSPs to acquire radiographs due to their ease. The range of sizes of intraoral PSPs allows us to choose the correct size for our pediatric patients or those with limited opening. The thin, flexible plate offers clear advantages because it is easier to position and sits more comfortably in the patient’s mouth. This standardizes the same workflow.

The PSP was placed into a standard Rinn-style holder (Dentsply Sirona) (Figure 2), which was then positioned into the patient’s mouth (Figure 3). Using a NOMAD Pro 2 handheld x-ray unit (Aribex), the proper settings were selected (Figure 4). The PSP was then exposed by pulling the trigger on the x-ray unit. The NOMAD units have been used for over a decade in my office because they are easy to use and provide increased efficiency for taking radiographs. The staff prefers the ease of use and ability to move with the patient in the event the patient has trouble remaining still during the procedure. The office needs only a couple of NOMAD units to cover 6 treatment rooms. After all the radiographs were exposed, the plates were removed from the barriers (Figure 5). 
The ScanX Intraoral View (Air Techniques) is our PSP scanner (Figure 6). This digital radiography system has a large touchscreen, easy-to-use interface, and multiple slots for simultaneous scanning of plates. The ScanX Intraoral View is WiFi-enabled, making the device exceptionally flexible and allowing it to be placed anywhere in the office. This makes PSP diagnostics quicker, more reliable, and more convenient.

The plates are transferred to the carrier and inserted into the ScanX Intraoral View (Figure 7). The device has a TWAIN interface so that it can be integrated with any dental imaging software. The images are scanned and a pop-up interface allows the selection of any filters or software enhancements (Figure 8). When completed, the images are stored into the patient’s imaging folder in CliniView (Apteryx). 

The radiographs are reviewed and an appropriate diagnosis is made. The durable PSP is then ready to be used again immediately thanks to an integrated erasure function. Through the use of the ScanX Intraoral View PSP scanner, any office can efficiently produce high-quality (20 Lp/mm) images that allow for good diagnostics, patient comfort, and increased efficiency.





GO-TO PRODUCT USED IN THIS CASE

SCANX INTRAORAL VIEW
This digital radiography system enables the intuitive, efficient, and time-saving digitization of PSPs for all intraoral formats. The high-resolution images allow the dental professional to accurately diagnose and convincingly show patients their treatment options, providing a faster and more intuitive workflow. ScanX Intraoral View’s imaging software automatically optimizes and saves all images. Diagnosis-supporting filters also can be used to adjust the contrast and sharpness of images.






 
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