Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

What you never knew about tooth sensitivity…and how to effectively treat it!

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Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Students, Dentists

  

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Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will understand:

» The two causes of / how to treat / and how to prevent / dentinal hypersensitivity found with:
o General sensitivity
o Exposed root sensitivity
o Post restorative (including crowns) sensitivity
o Hygiene and post periodontal surgery
o Teeth whitening

» Why some teeth end up requiring endodontic therapy at some point after new crowns and other restorations – and how to prevent that from ever happening again.

» How various desensitizers work, and what to look for in the ideal desensitizer.

» Why some patients are more or less susceptible to sensitivity.

» Why teeth whitening sensitivity occurs, and how to prevent it.

» What causes whitening zingers and how to prevent them.

Abstract

If you’re a practicing dentist, sensitivity is a thorn in your side…period. We’re all frustrated with sensitivity. I’m talking about chronic sensitivity (and unhappy patients), sometimes ending up in endodontic therapy, after new crowns are placed. And sensitivity after direct restorations. Sensitivity during and after hygiene procedures – and acute sensitivity after periodontal treatment, including surgery.

What about patients with super-sensitive exposed roots due to gingival recession? And of course there are simply those patients who constantly complain that their teeth are sensitive in general. Oh… and let’s not forget about the complaints of sensitivity during and after whitening procedures.

But did you know that if you really understood everything there is to know about sensitivity, all the various reasons it happens, how various desensitizers work, when and how to treat all of these types of sensitivity… and especially how to prevent it, you (and your patients) could breathe a huge sigh of relief?

Well, take heart. This webinar will teach you things you never knew before. And following the suggestions in the webinar will promptly lead to that needed sigh of relief!

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Kor Whitening.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 106 of 115

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Maximizing Continuing Care: A Practical Guide

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Target Audience: Dental Hygiene Students, Dental Hygienist, Dental Students, Dentists

Duration: 40:22

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Synopsis

WEBINAR: This 1-hour webinar will address concrete steps that can be taken to reduce revenue impact from no-shows, sudden changes in the schedule, or open time in the hygiene chair. The ins and outs of daily office life and how coordinating hygiene efforts can better the practice will also be discussed. Topics covered include the five "Rs": recall, recovery, re-activation, retention and referrals.

Get CE credit for this course here: http://dentallearning.net/maximizing-continuing-care-practical-guide

Videos 27 of 59

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Etiologies, Sequelae and Management of Dry Mouth

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Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the causes and management of the oral complications of dry mouth. After competing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Review saliva production and the functions of saliva;

2. List and describe etiologies for dry mouth;

3. Describe common oral complications, signs and symptoms associated with dry mouth; and,

4. Review options for the prevention, management and treatment of oral complications.

Abstract

Dry mouth affects a significant proportion of the population, with an increased prevalence with age. Etiologies include medication use, autoimmune diseases, head and neck radiation, chemotherapy, certain viral infections and a number of other causes. In addition, etiologies of transient dry mouth include dehydration, mouth breathing, snoring, tobacco and alcohol. Given the functions of saliva, the oral complications of dry mouth are significant, including an increased risk of dental caries, dental erosion, oral infections and irritations. Patients also experience difficulties eating, drinking, swallowing and talking. The management and treatment of the oral complications of dry mouth is essential to help restore and maintain oral health and quality of life.

 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from ORAPHARMA.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 7 of 115

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Current Concepts in Fluoride Therapy

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists

  

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with current concepts regarding the use of fluoride as a caries preventive. On completion of this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Describe the caries process

2. Review the mechanisms of action of fluoride for caries prevention

3. List and describe the types of topical fluorides that are available and their clinical efficacy

4. Review systemic fluorides, fluorosis and updated dosing recommendations

5. Describe factors responsible for orthodontic and xerostomic patients being at-risk for caries and review preventive treatment options

Abstract

Current concepts on dental caries as a dynamic process, the mechanisms of action of fluoride, and the use of systemic and topical fluorides are based on a substantial body of research and evidence. Dental caries is a multifactorial bacterial infection, and all factors must be considered. In order to provide a patient with a suitable preventive program, the patient’s risk level must be assessed and the program developed based on this and the age of the patient. Topical and systemic fluorides are safe and effective for caries control when used appropriately and are still considered the most effective method of controlling dental caries.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Chattem, Inc.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Biofilm, the host response and treatment in periodontal disease

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Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide information on periodontal disease and the role of biofilm in its development and progression. After completing the article, the reader will be able to:

1. Review the role of biofilm in periodontal disease;

2. Describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, destructive and protective chemical mediators;

3. List and describe risk factors; and,

4. Review options for treating chronic periodontitis and their efficacy.

Abstract

Periodontal disease, including gingivitis, is prevalent in the general population. Periodontal pathogens contained in dental biofilm play a central role in periodontitis; however, it is the interactions between the host and the biofilm that influence the onset and progression of the disease. Risk factors include environmental, acquired and genetic factors, some of which are modifiable risks. Initial periodontal therapy is typically nonsurgical scaling and root planing, followed by re-evaluation and periodontal maintenance. Antimicrobials may be used adjunctively, including systemic antibiotics, subantimicrobial doxycycline and locally applied antimicrobials. The use of adjuncts, where indicated, is guided by guidelines, and clinical judgment for the individual patient. The overall goal of therapy is to preserve the dentition and maintain or gain clinical attachment, and to prevent disease recurrence.

 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from ORAPHARMA.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Maximizing Continuing Care: A Practical Guide

Categories:

Author(s):

Course Type: elearning

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygiene Students, Dental Hygienist, Dentists

  

Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:

•List and review roles in the office that are responsible for continuing care.  

•Describe a hygiene coordinator's functions and how these can be performed.  

•List specific steps that can be taken to contact patients and increase retention and referrals.  

•Review how to talk to patients to increase recovery and re-activation.

Abstract

This 1-hour webinar will address concrete steps that can be taken to reduce revenue impact from no-shows, sudden changes in the schedule, or open time in the hygiene chair. The ins and outs of daily office life and how coordinating hygiene efforts can better the practice will also be discussed. Topics covered include the five "Rs": recall, recovery, re-activation, retention and referrals.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 67 of 115