Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

The New Normal: Returning to Practice with COVID 19

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, the reader should be able to:
• Provide a summary of the epidemiology, transmission routes, and signs of the COVID-19 disease caused by SARS-CoV-2.
• Discuss workplace controls and infection control strategies to minimize the chance of occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2.
• Explain how to safely and effectively manage patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 in the dental setting.
 

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Abstract

COVID-19, the coronavirus disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused widespread concern in the dental community. When the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a public health emergency, many dental offices were forced to close in the wake of the worldwide spread of the disease. Since the onset of COVID-19, hundreds of research articles have been written about the disease, and every governmental organization and public health agency worldwide has issued statements on extensive measures to reduce disease transmission and control the outbreak. As stay-at-home orders are lifted and dental offices begin to reopen, finding both current and specific recommendations for returning to work can be overwhelming for dental healthcare providers. The aim of this article is to provide the most current, scientific information about the impact of COVID-19 on the practice of dentistry, including a brief overview of disease epidemiology, routes of transmission, and symptoms. In addition, specific return-to-work guidelines will be discussed with a focus on patient management, workplace controls, and infection control strategies.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 112 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Selecting and Obtaining Equipment Using Evidence-Based Research for Improved Clinical Outcomes

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The goal of this article is to provide dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with information with regard to current trends and the available research in best practices to incorporate evidence-based care in their clinical decision-making when purchasing new dental equipment and armamentarium. The course will assist both employers and employees in weighing the benets of dental equipment choice, then establish a plan for employees to present their ndings to nancial decision-makers with the intent of acquiring the new piece of armamentarium. After reading this course, participants should be able to:

1. Describe evidence-based equipment choice through the use of systematic reviews
2. Acquire knowledge of reputable agencies and sources for product evaluations and opinions
3. Identify an applicable system for discussing return on investment and obtaining updated equipment for clinical practice.

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Abstract

Dr. G.V. Black's head would spin if as the father of modern dentistry he saw the innovations in dental equipment for today's general practice settings. New products emerge continuously; therefore, selecting and obtaining the latest equipment to improve clinical outcomes can be a challenge for clinicians practicing chairside. Sources of product evaluation are changing with the rise in digital communication and the decrease in trade show attendance. This course aims to sort the available research on these topics and provide solid selection criteria for choosing, procuring, and purchasing evidence-based dental equipment for clinical practice settings.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT: This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Dentsply Sirona.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 73 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Clinical Mindset and Workplace Burnout

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

Following the completion of this course, participants will be able to:

1. Classify trends and changes in the business of dentistry
2. Dene burnout as a medical condition and determine costs to dental practices
3. Introduce the stress continuum as related to burnout and achievement
4. Identify stress management strategies to reduce burnout and create work satisfaction.

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Abstract

Career burnout can prevent many dental hygiene professionals from achieving their goals as well as the result in high costs to the practice, the individual, and those at work and home. This article examines several factors that contribute to burnout and presents the research indicating that with early recognition and the right stress management steps are taken, a dental professional can have a thriving career.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Dentsply Sirona.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 72 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $29.00

Unlocking the Mystery of Dental Implant Classification & Maintenance

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, the participants should be able to:

1. Understand dental implant anatomy and physiology as it relates to the evaluation of health status.
2. Be familiar with the 2018 AAP Staging and Grading for dental implants and be able to apply these guidelines to their patients’ implant health.
3. Apply the knowledge gained in this course to customize individual patient implant maintenance programs.

Abstract

This course will discuss the 2018 American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) classification system as it pertains to dental implants. The life of an implant can vary greatly from patient to patient. Dental providers who treat patients with dental implants need to be up-to-date in the periodontal management of their patients’ implant status along the continuum of health and disease. The anatomy and physiology of dental implants will be reviewed and then applied to the new 2018 AAP classification system. By increasing your knowledge in the identification of peri-implant health and peri-implant disease, as laid out by the AAP, dental clinicians will be able to customize treatment recommendations for their patients with dental implants.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $29.00

Course 68 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Clean Between: Improve Interproximal Plaque Removal and Educate Patients Chairside

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

Improve Interproximal Plaque Removal and Chairside Patient Education Techniques 

The overall goal of this article is to provide dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with documented information regarding current trends, research, and potential solutions for biofilm removal in between the teeth. Following the completion of this course, participants will be able to:

1. Describe current trends for manual biofilm removal, including alternative practices for biofilm removal with power-driven patient homecare options;
2. Review proper techniques for educating patients on manual plaque removal;
3. Describe options for patient care delivery, coordinating research and industry education with chairside recommendations and patient education.

Abstract

Despite widely recognized evidence that most severe problems with gum tissue health occur between the teeth, effective methods for the removal of interproximal plaque and biofilm have proved to be a controversial topic in today’s dental industry. One clinician may promote the benefits of manual plaque and biofi lm disruption using an interproximal aid the patient accepts for compliance, while another clinician, sometimes practicing in the same office swears only flossing can be considered the gold standard in home care and no other available option will be effective for the patient except floss. Although these incongruencies in chairside recommendations will likely continue, the one remaining piece of evidence dental professionals can agree on is that interproximal care added to toothbrushing removes more plaque than brushing alone. Since providers, all agree on this fact, it is imperative that dental professionals remain current not only in the available research and modalities for interproximal plaque removal, but also in the proper techniques in chairside education and specific recommendations made to patients regarding the purchase of interproximal care items.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 61 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Dentifrice Ingredients Guide to Patient-Specific Recommendations

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

A Clinician's Guide to Dentifrices

At the completion of this program, the participant will

  • Describe the importance of using dentifrices to maintain oral health
  • Be able to list and describe ingredients in dentifrices
  • List the different broad categories of dentifrices
  • Understand the misconceptions about dentifrice abrasives
  • Compare the differences in abrasives in dentifrices
  • List the therapeutic agents in dentifrices
  • Understand the basis for dentifrice recommendations to patients

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Abstract

Patients have a variety of oral conditions that will require the dental professional to provide recommendations for dentifrices based upon the product’s ingredients.  Dentifrices contain active ingredients or additives that perform specific functions.  These ingredients and additives include abrasives, fluorides, remineralizing agents, desensitizing agents, antiplaque agents, and anti-tartar ingredients.  Toothpastes also contain detergents, humectants, thickeners, preservatives, flavoring agents, sweeteners, and coloring agents.  This article will review the common ingredients in toothpastes and the role abrasives play in plaque and stain removal.  Also, abrasives in toothpastes can have an efficacious role in the treatment of gingivitis and caries prevention.  It is the responsibility of the oral care professional to understand the ingredients in dentifrices so that patients can be provided specific recommendations based upon their individual needs.


COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Church & Dwight.
 

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 58 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis 

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information and scientific data on recurrent aphthous stomatitis. On completion of this course, the participant will be able to do the following:
1. List and describe the different types of recurrent aphthous ulcers;
2. Differentiate between recurrent aphthous ulcers and herpes simplex ulcers;
3. List and consider the different types of ulcers and associated conditions that must be part of the differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcers; and
4. Provide an overview of the types of treatments available for the different categories of recurrent aphthous ulcer patients.

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Abstract

Recurrent aphthous ulcers are commonly found in the general population. They consist of minor, major, and herpetiform types. A number of factors are considered to be possible etiological factors for recurrent aphthous ulcers; however, their exact etiology remains unclear. Several systemic diseases and conditions associated with oral ulcerations and other causes of oral ulcerations must be considered during the differential diagnosis. Once a definitive diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulceration has been made, the patient can be given palliative care for the lesions as well as advice and recommendations on nutrition, oral hygiene practices, and other factors that may be associated with his or her recurrent aphthous ulcers.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 46 of 126

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

What you never knew about tooth sensitivity…and how to effectively treat it!

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Students, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will understand:

» The two causes of / how to treat / and how to prevent / dentinal hypersensitivity found with:
o General sensitivity
o Exposed root sensitivity
o Post restorative (including crowns) sensitivity
o Hygiene and post periodontal surgery
o Teeth whitening

» Why some teeth end up requiring endodontic therapy at some point after new crowns and other restorations – and how to prevent that from ever happening again.

» How various desensitizers work, and what to look for in the ideal desensitizer.

» Why some patients are more or less susceptible to sensitivity.

» Why teeth whitening sensitivity occurs, and how to prevent it.

» What causes whitening zingers and how to prevent them.

Abstract

If you’re a practicing dentist, sensitivity is a thorn in your side…period. We’re all frustrated with sensitivity. I’m talking about chronic sensitivity (and unhappy patients), sometimes ending up in endodontic therapy, after new crowns are placed. And sensitivity after direct restorations. Sensitivity during and after hygiene procedures – and acute sensitivity after periodontal treatment, including surgery.

What about patients with super-sensitive exposed roots due to gingival recession? And of course, there are simply those patients who constantly complain that their teeth are sensitive in general. Oh… and let’s not forget about the complaints of sensitivity during and after whitening procedures.

But did you know that if you really understood everything there is to know about sensitivity, all the various reasons it happens, how various desensitizers work, when and how to treat all of these types of sensitivity… and especially how to prevent it, you (and your patients) could breathe a huge sigh of relief?

Well, take heart. This webinar will teach you things you never knew before. And following the suggestions in the webinar will promptly lead to that needed sigh of relief!

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Kor Whitening.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 35 of 126