Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Single-Patient-Use vs Multiple-Patient-Use Dental Burs

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, the reader should be able to:

• Discuss the history of dental burs and handpieces

• List the pros and cons of single-patient-use and multiple-patient-use armamentarium

• Analyze dental bur cost, efficiency, and infection control.

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Abstract

Dental armamentarium has evolved since the first tool-assisted manipulation of teeth thousands of years ago. In the modern era, discussion continues as to which tools will provide the best outcomes for patients and dental providers. One significant debate, especially in light of the heightened awareness of infection control, pits dental burs that are single-patient-use vs multiple-patient-use. Important considerations include overhead costs, cutting efficiency, and infection control. Manufacturing of dental burs and other armamentarium has an interesting history, and in this course you will learn where the technology and science stand at this moment in time.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 107 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Infection Prevention as a Functional Family System

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, the reader should be able to:
1. Review general systems theory and functional family theory
2. Recognize dental practice biofilm risk
3. Identify an infection protection process that fits the needs of a dental practice.
4. Discuss building a culture of safety in a dental practice
5. Utilize a functional coordinated systematic approach to infection protection and treatment room turn over
 

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Abstract

Family systems theory is a concept of looking at the family as a cohesive emotional unit. A family functions as a system wherein each member plays a specific role and must follow certain rules. Many dental practices function similarly, with both functional and dysfunctional systems. A change in one person sparks a change in others. Functional infection protection systems are required as a shared family responsibility with each individual trained and ready when needed.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Air Techniques.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 105 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Let’s Clear The Air: Taking Control of the Air Quality In Your Dental Office

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:
-Identify the airborne threats to our health that exist in a dental office setting.
-Discover the technologies available that can surgically scrub and recharge the air in your office assuring the best possible air quality.
-Recognize that being unaware of the air quality is not acceptable in the age of the novel coronavirus as the global public is now informed and educated on the threat of dental aerosols and the risk of contracting disease from breathing in a dental office.

Abstract

The dental office environment is well traveled with multiple humans coming and going throughout the day. Dental procedures produce aerosols that can carry bacteria, fungus, virus and create a biocloud that hangs around the office. This biocloud can be a source of respiratory infection and disease. Historically, as dentists, we have been unaware of how poor the air quality in our dental offices is. This is a most crucial subject as we can choose what we eat and drink, but we do not have a choice to take in our next breath. You can not see the quality of your air, but your body is affected by each breath. We must control the air quality in our offices to ensure good health for our patients, our team and ourselves. Never has this been as significant as the post-COVID-19 world we are entering. Patients and the global public are now aware of dental aerosols and air quality and this will evolve into a regulated entity. Fortunately, sophisticated technology is available that can surgically scrub the air in your office. The change in air quality is tangible and noticeable to everyone who enters your space. Learn about my own story of how I went from unaware of my poor air quality, to becoming an ardent supporter of dentists taking control and clearing the air in their workspaces.

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Surgically Clean Air
 

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 104 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Axiom CE Interactive Course: An Update on Instrument Processing

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

-Define the elements of the chain of infection. 
-Delineate and describe the differences in the processing of critical, semicritical, and noncritical instruments. 
-Review the use of presoaks and cleaning of instruments. 
-List and describe heat sterilization options and appropriate sterilization packaging. 
-Review the uses and purposes of mechanical, chemical, and biological indicators 

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_____________________________

Abstract

Description/Abstract: Safe and effective instrument processing is a key element of the infection prevention cycle. This process must meet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements. The steps involved depend on whether the instruments are critical, semicritical, or noncritical. Critical and heat-resistant critical instruments must be heat-sterilized. Prior to heat sterilization, instruments are wrapped in appropriate FDA-cleared sterilization packaging, which must include chemical indicators. Sterilization processes must be tested for sterility assurance in accordance with the guidelines and all sterilization records maintained.


COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Dentsply Sirona Preventive.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 88 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Infection Prevention: Risk Reduction and Compliance in the Dental Office

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide information on risk reduction, preventive measures, and infection control compliance. After completing this course, the reader should be able to:

  1. Describe the modes of transmission of disease in the dental setting
  2. Identify risks in the dental setting and describe risk reduction
  3. Delineate and describe infection control preventive measures
  4. Review methods to improve and maintain compliance with infection control recommendations and regulations.

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Abstract

Effective infection control requires an understanding of modes of transmission and how to prevent this from occurring. Risk reduction requires solutions that could result in the elimination of a risk factor or reduce the chance of that risk factor causing harm. In addition, infection control breaches incur several potential consequences; the first of which is potential harm to patients and dental healthcare personnel through exposure to microorganisms and the risk of disease, as well as exposure to chemicals. Preventive measures are necessary for effective infection prevention. Each dental ofce should develop and maintain written infection control policies and procedures. A culture of safety and compliance with recommendations, regulations, and protocols is also necessary for effective risk reduction.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Hu-Friedy.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 84 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

The Cutting Edge: Reprocessing and Maintenance

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide information on the care of low-speed handpieces and burs. After completing this article, the reader should be able to:
 

  1. Review the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations on the reprocessing of handpieces/attachments and motors
  2. List tips and know how to avoid common errors in handpiece/attachment and motor reprocessing
  3. Describe the CDC recommendations for stand-alone
    (cordless) devices
  4. Review considerations in selecting burs and their role in efficiency, safety, and the functioning of handpieces/attachments.

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Abstract

Instrument reprocessing is a key component of infection control. Core steps in instrument reprocessing for handpieces, motors, and other attachments are similar to other instruments and devices; however, there are also specific steps that differ and vary by type and manufacturer. All such devices that attach to and detach from the dental unit air and waterlines should be cleaned and heat sterilized (autoclaved) following the manufacturer’s instructions for reprocessing. In addition, device maintenance is essential for proper functioning, safety, and longevity of these devices. Consideration should also be given to burs and their role in effective, efficient, and safe patient care.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 83 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Pathways to Infection Prevention: An Update

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide the reader with information on infection prevention. On completion of this course, participants will be able to:
 
  1. Describe the chain of infection and modes of transmission
  2. List the elements involved in the daily infection prevention cycle
  3. Review the importance of hand hygiene, appropriate procedures, and factors that influence compliance with hand hygiene
  4. List and describe the steps involved in the treatment of clinical contact surfaces
  5. Delineate each step in instrument processing
  6. Describe the activities necessary at the beginning and end of each day

Abstract

To prevent the transmission of microorganisms and disease, a robust infection control program is required. The guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control provide recommendations for infection control in dental healthcare settings, and in order to break the chain of infection and prevent disease transmission attention to every detail of infection control procedures is required. Steps include those required at the beginning and end of the day and repeated procedures that are performed for each and every patient. CDC guidelines, OSHA and EPA regulations must be followed and appropriate FDA-cleared supplies used for infection control.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Dentsply Sirona Preventive.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 81 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

An Update on Instrument Processing

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The overall objective of this article is to provide the reader with information on instrument processing. On completing this article, the reader will be able to do the following:
 
  1. Define the elements of the chain of infection;
  2. Delineate and describe the differences in the processing of critical, semicritical and noncritical instruments;
  3. Review the use of presoaks and cleaning of instruments;
  4. List and describe heat sterilization options and appropriate sterilization packaging; and
  5. Review the uses and purposes of chemical and biological indicators.

Download this course PDF
_________________________________

Abstract

Safe and effective instrument processing is a key element of the infection prevention cycle. This process must meet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements. The steps involved depend on whether the instruments are critical, semicritical, or noncritical. Critical and heat-resistant critical instruments must be heat-sterilized. Prior to heat sterilization, instruments are wrapped in appropriate FDA-cleared sterilization packaging, which must include chemical indicators. Sterilization processes must be tested for sterility assurance in accordance with the guidelines and all sterilization records maintained.
 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Dentsply Sirona Preventive.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 80 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

AN OVERVIEW OF INFECTION PREVENTION IN THE DENTAL OFFICE

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

Infection Prevention in the Dental Office

The goal of this course is to provide a general overview of infection prevention in the dental setting. After completing this course, the reader should be able to:

1. Define modes of transmission in the dental setting.
2. Describe appropriate hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment during patient care and other activities.
3. Review the management of clinical contact surfaces.
4. List and describe steps in instrument reprocessing.

Abstract

 Infection prevention is a key activity in the dental office essential to prevent the transmission of microorganisms and disease among patients and dental healthcare personnel. It must be performed in a reliable and effective manner in accordance with current recommendations to ensure patient safety, and in accordance with regulations that protect the safety and health of dental healthcare personnel. Infection prevention protocols that are effective, reliable, and standardized promote health and safe dental visits.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 67 of 117

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Protocols for REPROCESSING HANDPIECES & ATTACHMENTS: Connecting the Steps

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the instrument processing of handpieces, attachments, and components. After reading this article, participants should be able to:

1. Describe the findings of studies performed to determine the potential for handpiece and attachment contamination during use.
2. List and describe typical steps in handpiece reprocessing.
3. Review challenges and outcomes of inadequate cleaning, lubrication, purging, and of not following the IFU on autoclaving.
4. Discuss required handpiece maintenance and repairs.

Abstract

Reprocessing of handpieces and attachments is one of the cornerstones of infection prevention, and essential for the delivery of safe dental care. Thorough reprocessing of handpieces and attachments in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations and relevant regulations is essential. The CDC recommends that reprocessing of handpieces and attachments that attach to and detach from the dental unit’s air and water lines includes a series of steps that include cleaning and autoclaving. In some states, this is a regulation. For cordless stand-alone units, current FDA regulations should be followed, per the CDC, including following the validated manufacturer’s Instructions for Use (IFU) for reprocessing of these devices. The handpiece manufacturer’s instructions for reprocessing in the IFU must be followed, as well as recommendations for maintenance, effective reprocessing, and to prolong the life of handpieces and attachments.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 65 of 117