Upcoming Events / / Event Details

Oral Disease: Are We Watching a Silent Killer?

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Date: 2019-09-20 08:00:00

Location: 4301 W Markham Street Little Rock, AR 72205

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Event Details

Upcoming Event: Oral Disease, Are We Watching a Silent Killer?

It is time to implement new clinical approaches that will save lives! Dental care can never be the same again! With increasing evidence that the presence of oral disease can significantly impact a person's overall health, dental professionals must enter treatment rooms with a different approach to treating patients. We have moved from focusing on just teeth and gums to serving in the role of saving lives. The days of watching dental disease are a thing of the past. It's time to stop, drop old philosophies, and roll with comprehensive care.

We must now focus on utilizing advanced periodontal therapies and tests that will enable us to identify individuals at risk for numerous systematic diseases and provide individualized care that will return them to health. Successful practices will implement the systems they learn in this course and will experience exponential practice growth while making an impact on their patients' lives.

This course will enhance attendee's knowledge on the latest research on the oral-systemic link, will review advanced periodontal protocols that can lead to improving oral health, and will challenge dental professionals to create collaborative relationships with the medical community. Attendees will leave motivated to make a greater impact on the lives of the patients they serve on a daily basis.
Event 2 of 3

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis 

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information and scientific data on recurrent aphthous stomatitis. On completion of this course, the participant will be able to do the following:
1. List and describe the different types of recurrent aphthous ulcers;
2. Differentiate between recurrent aphthous ulcers and herpes simplex ulcers;
3. List and consider the different types of ulcers and associated conditions that must be part of the differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcers; and
4. Provide an overview of the types of treatments available for the different categories of recurrent aphthous ulcer patients.

Abstract

Recurrent aphthous ulcers are commonly found in the general population. They consist of minor, major, and herpetiform types. A number of factors are considered to be possible etiological factors for recurrent aphthous ulcers; however, their exact etiology remains unclear. Several systemic diseases and conditions associated with oral ulcerations and other causes of oral ulcerations must be considered during the differential diagnosis. Once a definitive diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulceration has been made, the patient can be given palliative care for the lesions as well as advice and recommendations on nutrition, oral hygiene practices, and other factors that may be associated with his or her recurrent aphthous ulcers.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 67 of 95

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Analgesics in Dentistry

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide information on nonparenteral analgesics used in dentistry. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:
1. Describe opioid medications and aspects of the new ADA policy on opioids.
2. List and describe ingested nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used in dentistry for pain management.
3. Describe an inhaled NSAID that can be used for acute pain management.
4. Review findings from systematic reviews and trials comparing opioid and non-opioid analgesics.

Abstract

Historically, management of acute odontogenic pain in adolescents and adults has typically been accomplished through an approach that incorporated nonparenteral opioid and/or nonopioid analgesics. However, the availability of opioid analgesics has resulted in epidemic levels of opioid abuse and addiction. Alternative treatment strategies utilizing non-opioids are preferable for management of acute pain, where indicated, including moderate to severe pain. Non-opioids include NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and combination medications, and are more, or as, effective as opioids. This article reviews opioid medications before focusing on non-opioid analgesics, as both monotherapy and combination therapy, for the safe and effective management of acute postprocedural pain in dentistry.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Orapharma.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 60 of 95

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Analgesics in Dentistry

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Date: 01-15-2018 13:25:04 pm


Historically, management of acute odontogenic pain in adolescents and adults has typically been accomplished through an approach that incorporated nonparenteral opioid and/or nonopioid analgesics. However, the availability of opioid analgesics has resulted in epidemic levels of opioid abuse and addiction. Alternative treatment strategies utilizing non-opioids are preferable for management of acute pain, where indicated, including moderate to severe pain. Non-opioids include NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and combination medications, and are more, or as, effective as opioids. This article reviews opioid medications before focusing on non-opioid analgesics, as both monotherapy and combination therapy, for the safe and effective management of acute postprocedural pain in dentistry.

Analgesics are prescribed and/or recommended to dental patients to relieve pain, which may be acute or longer-term chronic in nature. Pain experienced following oral maxillofacial surgery is acute pain, while an example of chronic pain would include patients with long-term temporomandibular joint pain associated with temporomandibular joint disease. Analgesics for postprocedural pain management are mainly used following oral maxillofacial surgery for extractions, implant placement, bone grafting, endodontic therapy, and periodontal surgery. However, they may also be recommended and prescribed preprocedurally for the management of postprocedural pain. The main focus of this article is the use of nonparenteral analgesics that are ingested orally or ministered nasally for the relief of acute dental pain in adults. Analgesic medications used in dentistry include opioid and non-opioid medications, typically given orally.

Educational Objectives
The overall goal of this course is to provide information on nonparenteral analgesics used in dentistry. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:
1. Describe opioid medications and aspects of the new ADA policy on opioids.
2. List and describe ingested nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used in dentistry for pain management.
3. Describe an inhaled NSAID that can be used for acute pain management.
4. Review findings from systematic reviews and trials comparing opioid and non-opioid analgesics.

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Article 6 of 10

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Etiologies, Sequelae and Management of Dry Mouth

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

Etiologies, Sequelae and Management of Dry Mouth

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the causes and management of the oral complications of dry mouth. After competing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Review saliva production and the functions of saliva;

2. List and describe etiologies for dry mouth;

3. Describe common oral complications, signs and symptoms associated with dry mouth; and,

4. Review options for the prevention, management and treatment of oral complications.

Abstract

Dry mouth affects a significant proportion of the population, with an increased prevalence with age. Etiologies include medication use, autoimmune diseases, head and neck radiation, chemotherapy, certain viral infections and a number of other causes. In addition, etiologies of transient dry mouth include dehydration, mouth breathing, snoring, tobacco and alcohol. Given the functions of saliva, the oral complications of dry mouth are significant, including an increased risk of dental caries, dental erosion, oral infections and irritations. Patients also experience difficulties eating, drinking, swallowing and talking. The management and treatment of the oral complications of dry mouth is essential to help restore and maintain oral health and quality of life.

 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from ORAPHARMA.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 7 of 95

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Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Sjögren Syndrome: Oral Manifestations, Complications and Management

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists from novice to advanced

  

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Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on the management of the oral complications associated with Sjögren syndrome. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Describe classic signs and symptoms of Sjögren syndrome, and its prevalence;

2. List and describe changes in salivary flow and composition;

3. Review the oral complications of Sjögren syndrome; and,

4. Review options for the management of oral complications associated with Sjögren syndrome.

Abstract

Sjögren syndrome is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disease with significant oral and systemic complications. Oral manifestations and complications of this disease include parched oral mucosa, discomfort, increased risk for caries and dental erosion, increased prevalence of candidal infections, and other conditions. A diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome may be suspected if dry mouth and dry eyes are both present, however a definitive diagnosis requires further investigation. Management of the oral complications of this syndrome requires palliative care/treatment of dry mouth and preventive care. Given the increased risk for oral diseases and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, frequent recalls and therapy are required.

 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from ORAPHARMA.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

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